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  • 0 Bobby Womack the Poet

    • Photo
    • by Kingsley H. Smith
    • 05/29/2007

    Bobby Womack's 1981 classic soul album, The Poet, was #1 on the R&B album chart for 5 weeks. The legendary track, "If You Think You're Lonely Now," is one of the album's highlights. If you have a copy of this rare album, hold on to it. Previous Post | Next Post

  • 0 On Tape Flashback Plugs 8 Track and Cassette Catalogue

    • Photo
    • by Kingsley H. Smith
    • 04/11/2007

    We've been featuring interesting magazine covers from my personal magazine archive on recent consecutive Wednesdays. Today is the 4th of a 5 part series with a Spring 1972 cover in the spotlight. This is volume one, number one, of On Tape, a magazine billing itself as the "complete tape guide." On Tape is unusual in that the first eight pages of the magazine contain editorial content, the next 75 pages list only 8 track and cassette music/spoken word items in a directory, and the last eight pages contain additional editorial content. A typical On Tape listing looks like this: Staple Singers Soul Folk in Action STX ST8-2004 (8 track) STC-2004 (cassette) $5.98 This premier issue glorified 'Four-channel Stereo' in an article by Robert Angus. Also known as quadraphonic sound, the passing fad of four-channel stereo tried to reproduce the concert hall experience by recording four separate channels. Drummer, vocalist Buddy Miles talks candidly in the featured cover article. Of all the people he's played with, Buddy says Otis Redding had the biggest influence on him. Buddy Miles has played with them all, discover more about him, and listen to my interview with Buddy Miles recorded at the famous Bottom Line club in New York City. This is Magazine Flashback part 4 of 5 See Magazine Flashback part 1 of 5 See Magazine Flashback part 2 of 5 See Magazine Flashback part 3 of 5 See Magazine Flashback part 5 of 5 ----- Previous Post | Next Post

  • 0 The Blues & Soul UK - USA Connection

    • Photo
    • by Kingsley H. Smith
    • 04/04/2007

    We've been featuring interesting magazine covers from my personal magazine archive on recent consecutive Wednesdays. Today is the 3rd of a 5 part series with a June 1970 cover in the spotlight. Blues & Soul, still going strong, was first published in 1966. The magazine is based in London, U.K. This is issue number 35, dated June 5 - June 18, 1970, featuring the Jackson 5. My copy of the magazine is an original I purchased in 1970 on a trip to London. It's also a rare edition you can find on eBay, if you are willing to pay the price collectors are asking. This J5 edition featured excellent transatlantic chart coverage with... The top 50 U.K. singles The top 30 U.K. albums The top 100 USA singles The top 40 USA albums There's a 'page two' editorial, amusing by today's standards, noting that music consumers will stop buying albums if the number of tracks keep going down, and the album prices keep going up! A 25 minute Wilson Pickett album is used as an example. It's been a long way from issue 35 to the current Blues & Soul issue 992. B&S will celebrate issue 1,000 during the Summer of 2007. The quality of Blues & Soul continues to be top notch. Blues & Soul (also called B&S) includes all the latest U.K. and U.S.A. "urban music" info, including news, charts, reviews, events and clubs, as well as in-depth interviews and editorials on influential artists past and present. This is Magazine Flashback part 3 of 5 See Magazine Flashback part 1 of 5 See Magazine Flashback part 2 of 5 See Magazine Flashback part 4 of 5 See Magazine Flashback part 5 of 5 ----- Previous Post | Next Post

  • 0 Rebirth of the Blues Flashback

    • Photo
    • by Kingsley H. Smith
    • 03/28/2007

    We've been featuring interesting magazine covers from my personal magazine archive on recent consecutive Wednesdays. Today is the 2nd of a 5 part series with another 1969 cover in the spotlight. The blues has never gone away, but according to Peter Barnes and Paul D. Zimmerman of Newsweek in this May 26th edition, the art form was experiencing a surprising rebirth during the year of Woodstock. You were more likely to hear the blues revival on progressive rock radio, rather than on the soul stations of the day, as R&B radio was delivering the slick contemporary sounds of Motown and Philly. A similar parallel exists today, as R&B maintains a diminished foothold next to the advancing forces of hip-hop. B.B. King, Big Mama Thornton, Muddy Waters, and Albert King are mentioned as a few of the authentic purveyors carrying the blues flag forward. The authors acknowledge Canned Heat, Johnny Winter, Jimi Hendrix, and even Blood Sweat & Tears for plugging in new audiences to the expanding blues universe. The cover darling of this article was Janis Joplin. She would live only 16 more months after this feature was published. I can tell you from the one Janis Joplin concert I attended at the Singer Bowl in New York City, she sang hard, drank hard, and put her all into her performance. Yes, she did have a bottle with her on stage, and I don't mean water. In the context of the times, the Port Arthur, Texas native offered her concept of the blues through a rock edged lens. You can debate the authenticity of this approach, but her emotion leaped out from deep inside, projected by a memorable voice oozing peppered passion, in convincing fashion from the soul. So, two years shy of the 40th anniversary of ?The Rebirth of the Blues,? we salute the bluesmen and women past and present, who sing the reality stories of sadness, joy, and everyday experiences. This is Magazine Flashback part 2 of 5 See Magazine Flashback part 1 of 5 See Magazine Flashback part 3 of 5 See Magazine Flashback part 4 of 5 See Magazine Flashback part 5 of 5 ----- Previous Post | Next Post

  • 0 Original Dreamgirl Showstopper Jennifer Holliday

    • Photo
    • by Kingsley H. Smith
    • 12/27/2006

    Here's a picture of the original Dreamgirls showstopper, Jennifer Holliday. This is one of the 45 rpm picture sleeves from the original Broadway cast album. Jennifer is our final classic soul 45 rpm picture treat for you this holiday week, as we head towards 2007. Previous Post | Next Post

  • 0 Evelyn 'Champagne' King uncorks her New Spirit

    • Photo
    • by Kingsley H. Smith
    • 10/25/2006

    I've always enjoyed Evelyn "Champagne" King, (left in this photo, along with Thelma Houston, and the late Vicki Sue Robinson). Of the three times I've seen E-C-K live, her booming voice always left a lasting impression. She started out in the music business as a teenager, performing her lively hits, including "Shame," "Love Come Down," and "I Don't Know if it's Right." Evelyn's waited in the wings for over a decade before recently signing a new recording deal. She really hasn't gone anywhere, as she's continued to perform through the years. Her new album will give her the opportunity to expose her talent to a whole new generation. Previous Post | Next Post

  • 0 Soulful 45 RPM Picture Sleeve Flashback

    • Photo
    • by Kingsley H. Smith
    • 10/12/2006

    By approximately 1990, 45 RPM picture sleeves faded into music history. The colorful jackets artfully promoted the latest songs by eager recording acts with visions of hits dancing in their heads. The seven inch vinyl record inside of the sleeve also faded into oblivion along with 8 track tapes, turntables, and electric typewriters. CD singles still come with picture sleeves, but as digital downloading of music becomes more popular, the days of CD singles are numbered. Retail CD albums will probably last a little longer. Can you guess what year these four songs with sleeves were released?      Hint: all four are from the same year in the 1980's. These four original 45 RPM picture sleeves, from the PowerhouseRadio.com collection, promoted what turned out to be major hits for Michael Jackson and Whitney Houston, and minor releases for Natalie Cole and Smokey Robinson. As you might guess, sleeves keep increasing in value. Do you have any in your collection? Most 45 RPM picture sleeves, even without the vinyl records inside, fetch between $5 to $10 a piece in 2006. Several authors have written books estimating the value of these sleeves. The more famous the act, the more value the sleeve has. I'm lucky enough to have several hundred original 45 RPM picture sleeves going back to 1964, 99.5% with the records too, and I plan to hold on to all of them. Answer to the trivia question: 1987. Want to use any of our picture sleeves as a screen saver? Visit the Powerhouse Radio Picture Sleeve Pop Wallpapers collection. Previous Post | Next Post

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